The Law Office of Richard Vaznaugh

Experts in Workplace Rights for Bay Area Workers

505 Sansome Street, Suite 850
San Francisco, CA 94111
Phone: (415) 593-0076
Fax: (415) 653-8935

Contact Us

Contact Our Office

505 Sansome Street, Suite 850
San Francisco, CA 94111
Phone: (415) 593-0076
Fax: (415) 653-8935
Map/Directions

Parking: There is paid parking available in the building. The garage entrance is in the rear of the building, on Fern Street. On-street parking, both metered and un-metered, is also possible. Please note the City enforced time limits and other limitations.

Public Transportation: To reach the office from BART, disembark at the Montgomery BART Station, walk one block north to Sutter Street and ride the “2” or “3” Muni bus line for approximately 10 minutes to Van Ness Ave.

Van Ness Ave. and Sutter Street are major corridors for public transportation. See 511.org for other routes.

Request a Consultation or More Information

DISCLAIMER

You understand that no attorney-client relationship will exist unless we have agreed to represent you.

You are urged not to send us any information contained in an e-mail or any attachment that you believe is highly confidential until such time as we have indicated to you that we are able to review that information.

By sending us your communication, you agree that submitting unsolicited e-mail information to us does not constitute a request for legal advice and that you are not forming an attorney-client relationship with us by submitting that information.

Please use the form below to request a consultation or additional information. Items marked with an asterisk (*) are required.




Is this this email address provided by your employer?





Were/Are you paid a salary or an hourly rate?




Did/Do you have an Employment Contract?

Did you sign an arbitration agreement with your employer?










Did you complain about the sexual harassment?


If your complaint is about discrimination, what type of discrimination? (check all that apply):












If your complaint is about sexual harassment or discrimination, have you filed a claim with the DFEH and/or EEOC?


Did/Does your employer keep track of your hours worked? (i.e., time clock, time cards)


If salaried, did/do you spend the majority of your time with managerial and administrative duties?

If salaried, did/do you earn at least $2,340.00 per month?

Were/Are you classified as an independent contractor?




Did/Do you get paid time and one-half for your overtime?

Were/Are you given paid 10 minute rest breaks for every 4 hours worked?

Were/Are you given unpaid meal breaks of at least 30 minutes for every 5 hours worked?

Are there other current or former employees that are in the same situation?


Vaznaugh Weekly Weekly

Topic of the Week

Millennial Bosses

If you haven't already worked for a younger boss, it won't be long. So the days of forcing younger employees to adjust to the rest of us are in the past, it's now our job to adjust to them.

Read more...

Blog of the Week

Slate column asks readers to see the ‘upside’ of sexual harassment in the office

On Tuesday, Slate published another example of a powerful person abusing that power and thus endangering women in the workplace.

Thought for the Week

"The reason people blame things on the previous generations is that there's only one other choice."

–Doug Larson

List of the Week

from Norwegian University of Life Science

Nature Works: Working Without Windows

  • Workers without windows in cubes or offices were 5 times more likely to bring plants
  • Workers without windows were 3 times more likely to bring pictures of nature
  • Workers use pictures and plants to compensate for the lack of a window  

Top Five News Headlines

  1. Sports unions unveil universal declaration of player rights
  2. Walmart Will Let Its 1.4 Million Workers Take Their Pay Before Payday
  3. Employers would pocket $5.8 billion of workers’ tips under Trump administration’s proposed ‘tip stealing’ rule
  4. The Reckoning: Women and Power in the Workplace
  5. Healthcare Insecurities Keep Workers Locked in Jobs